Posted by: Anne Murray | July 10, 2014

Looking at bugs

Hot summer days are a good time to look for invertebrates, including butterflies, moths and dragonflies.

Here are a few photos of local B.C. insects, some recent, some from previous summers. If you can help with correct identification, please get in touch! Insect identification is quite tricky for beginners.

golden jewel beetle July 2014 garden

I was excited to find this beautiful beetle in our veggie patch. Consulting a field guide, I decided it was a Golden Jewel Beetle, Buprestis aurulenta, which is common around coniferous trees.

Anise Swallowtail butterfly, rather worn, on buddleia

Anise Swallowtail butterfly, rather worn, on buddleia

The Anise Swallowtail (Papilio zelicaon) is commonly found near Boundary Bay, Delta, where it feeds on cow parsley and angelica lucida.

However, this specimen was photographed in my garden a couple of summers ago.

Western Tiger Swallowtail

Western Tiger Swallowtail

This Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutilis) is common in southern B.C. throughout the summer and was photographed on that same buddleia plant.

Painted Lady butterfly

Painted Lady butterfly

Painted Lady butterflies (Vanessa cardui) are migratory and occur cyclically in southern B.C.. This photo was taken a few years ago. I have not seen any of this species this year.

Sara Orange Tip

Sara Orange Tip

Sara Orange Tip (Anthocaris sara) – this pretty butterfly is rather uncommon. Its larvae feed on mustard plants.

Eight spot skimmer

Eight spot skimmer

Dragonflies can be difficult to photograph as they dart around the garden. Two of these skimmers arrived in our veggie patch in late June and were very accommodating. They sat still long enough to give us a good view.

This darner sp. dragonfly visited our fruit trees

This darner sp. dragonfly visited our fruit trees

Blinded Sphinx Moth Paonias excaecatus

Blinded Sphinx Moth
Paonias excaecatus

This beautiful moth turned up on an apple tree a couple of years ago. I keep hoping another will come.  

The Satyr comma butterfly looks like a crumpled leaf and is well camouflaged in the forest.

Satyr comma  (Polygonia satyrus)

Satyr comma
(Polygonia satyrus)

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Responses

  1. Hi Anne, we saw lots of butterflys in the Skagit Valley in the Chitenden Meadows a few weeks ago. A great blog subject. A

  2. So beautiful! Thank you for sharing and making us aware of their stunning presence!


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